Activities Directors QuarterlyAbstracts
Activities Directors Quarterly ®

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American Journal of Disaster Medicine

Journal of Opioid Management

Opioid Management Society
Opioid Education Programs

Journal of Neurodegeneration & Regeneration

Activities Directors' Quarterly for Alzheimer's & Other Dementia Patients

American Journal of Recreation Therapy

Journal of Emergency Management

Healing Ministry

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Activities Directors Quarterly
Winter 2008, Volume 9
, Number 1


Article
ADQ inservice Notes from nursing: Strokes
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Winter 2008; pages 5-6

Abstract
This article provides simple tips for interacting with residents who have had strokes. These tips may also be taught to family members to improve the quality of their visits.


Article
Mrs. X: Not waving but drowning
Diane Dettmore, EdD, RN; Ann Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FAAN
Winter 2008; pages 7-8

Abstract
This case study demonstrates the use of implicit memories to decrease agitation and aggression in a person with dementia. Psychomotor skills that were learned earlier can provide periods of clarity and distraction when behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia manifest. Specific therapeutic techniques are also mentioned which also help to abate these symptoms and often result in a decrease in the need for pharmacological interventions.


Article
Competitive sports activities for men
Ellen Tolle, RN, MPS
Winter 2008; pages 9-13

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe two sports activities that are very popular with the men at our dementia-specific day program. These activities can be successful at a day program or long-term care facility.


Article
Waiting for Godot, while living with a diagnosis of dementia, probably of the Alzheimer’s type
Richard Taylor, PhD
Winter 2008; pages 14-16

Abstract
Richard Taylor, PhD, has been living with the diagnosis of Dementia, probably of the Alzheimer's type for the past six years. He recently published a book of his essays (Alzheimer's from the Inside Out, available from HealthProPress.com 1-888-337-8808). He looks forward to your response to his thoughts at richardtaylorphd @gmail.com.


Article
Hearing loss in clients with dementia: Tips from audiology
Anne E. Hogan, MS, CCC-A
Winter 2008; pages 19-22

Abstract
To facilitate better communication between the caregiver and client with dementia and hearing loss, through an introduction to available technology and compensatory strategies.


Article
ADQ Proven Activities Backyard weather station
Winter 2008; pages 23-23


Article
ADQ Seasonal Planner
Winter 2008; pages 24-25

Abstract
March, April, and May


Article
ADQ Featured Lesson Plan Woodworking program to build self esteem
Winter 2008; pages 26-28


Article
Pet encounters: Animal-assisted therapy for frail older adults
Linda L. Buettner, PhD, CTRS
Winter 2008; pages 29-45

Abstract
Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT), or using trained animals to facilitate therapeutic outcomes, is becoming a more popular way to provide effective therapy to older adults. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness about AAT and to introduce an effective program which provides AAT: Pet Encounters. This article describes the Pet Encounters program, its requirements, components, procedures, benefits, and evaluation methods.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Spring 2008, Volume 9
, Number 2


Article
ADQ inservice Notes from nursing: Recognizing depression
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Spring 2008; pages 5-6

Abstract
This article provides tips for recognizing depression in long term care residents.


Article
Editorial Clearing the Confusion: HR 4248, “Ensuring Medicare Access to Recreational Therapy Act of 2007”
Thomas K. Skalko, LRT/CTRS; Diane Baumann, MS, LRT/CTRS; Lisa Morgan, CTRS
Spring 2008; pages 7-9

Abstract
To provide clarification about proposed federal wording changes requested by the recreation therapy profession. It is important that activities directors and recreation therapists work together to provide meaningful and therapeutic activities and interventions for all nursing home residents. For those complex residents the continuum of care linking recreation therapy and activities is an important concept we all need to embrace.


Article
Beyond bingo: Training to enhance use of evidence-based protocols
Marianne Smith, PhD, ARNP, BC
Spring 2008; pages 10-14

Abstract
This brief article describes the development and proposed implementation of a novel dementia training program that targets involvement in meaningful, person appropriate activities.


Article
The use of art to provide memory support for individuals with Alzheimer’s-type dementia
Ryan Francis; Nicole DeVoid; Hattie Landry; Nancy E. Richeson, PhD, CTRS
Spring 2008; pages 15-18

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of how art can be used to provide memory support for individuals with Alzheimer’s-type dementia through stimulating implicit memories to increase cognition. An overview of supportive literature is provided.


Article
A day in the life of Daisy
Laura Freeze, BS
Spring 2008; pages 19-22

Abstract
My name is Laura Freeze (alias Daisy). I am currently a graduate student in the field of therapeutic recreation, with a specific interest in Alzheimer’s/Dementia care programming. As an assignment I was asked to become a nursing home resident for four consecutive hours one life-changing Monday. Above, you found my experiences relived through the eyes of Daisy.


Article
ADQ Proven Activities Summertime social dance club
Spring 2008; pages 23-23


Article
ADQ Seasonal Planner
Spring 2008; pages 24-25

Abstract
June, July, and August


Article
ADQ Featured Lesson Plan Outdoor art
Spring 2008; pages 26-26


Article
Intergenerational programs: An evaluation of the literature
Michael Magnes, MS
Spring 2008; pages 27-47

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the literature and evaluate the outcomes of intergenerational activity participation. Intergenerational activity is the bridging of two or more age populations for the purposes of joint participation, with a goal of positive benefit to all groups. This project focused solely on the impacts and outcomes for older adults, as a direct result of participating in intergenerational activity. This project includes a systematic review of previously conducted research investigating the outcomes of intergenerational activities, the effects of those outcomes on successful aging, and recommendations for practitioners and researchers. Sixty studies, articles, and reports were reviewed. Twenty articles were excluded and deemed inappropriate for the purposes of this project. Table 1 summarizes the findings of the 20 research studies with conclusive outcomes. Twenty additional studies, articles, and reports are cited in various sections of the article. Current research on the topic of intergenerational activity was sparse and the absence of control groups was very apparent. In many instances, the focus of the research was on the younger cohort and the outcomes for the older adult group were reported as afterthoughts. Nevertheless, the studies summarized in Table 1 conclusively demonstrate intergenerational activity participation impacts positively older adults.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Summer 2008, Volume 9
, Number 3


Article
Editorial Collaboration for QOL
Linda L. Buettner, PhD, CTRS, LRT
Summer 2008; pages 5-6

Abstract
• To understand the   continuum of   services needed to   provide an active   lifestyle to all   nursing home   residents. • To open an dialog   between Activities   Professionals and   Recreational   Therapists. • To encourage   interdisciplinary   action for enhanced   quality of life.


Article
ADQ inservice Notes from nursing: Shortness of breath (SOB)
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP; Jana Sheets
Summer 2008; pages 7-9

Abstract
This article provides tips for recognizing triggers and symptoms of shortness of breath in long term care residents.


Article
Evidence supporting expressive arts interventions for persons in early-stage Alzheimer’s Disease
Nancy E. Richeson, PhD, CTRS; Buettner L; McKenzie SE; Burgener SC; Buckwalter KC; Beattie E; Bossen AL; Fick D; Fitzsimmons S; Kolanowski A; Rose K; Specht JKP; Testad I; Yu F
Summer 2008; pages 10-22

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to grade research evidence supporting expressive arts-based interventions for persons with early-stage dementias and to report the recommendations of a consensus panel. The search produced nine databased articles testing the effects of expressive arts including writing, art and creative activities, and dance therapies on a variety of outcomes. The body of evidence to support expressive arts interventions in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease is growing and has potential as a treatment modality following translational studies in a variety of activity therapies.


Article
ADQ Proven Activities Adventure Bird Club (ABC)
Summer 2008; pages 23-23


Article
ADQ Seasonal Planner
Summer 2008; pages 24-25

Abstract
September, October, November


Article
Planning for safety during activity programs Extra vigilance to prevent falls during activities
Summer 2008; pages 26-27


Article
Teaching technology to older adults
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Summer 2008; pages 29-31

Abstract
This article provides practical ideas and strategies for teaching technology basics to older adults in long-term care facilities.


Article
Movement with Meaning: Innovation for early-stage Alzheimer’s disease
Barbara Larsen, MA, Ed
Summer 2008; pages 32-33

Abstract
Movement with Meaning provides an opportunity for each participant to become focused in the present through total immersion in short, concentrated exercises that stimulate physical, mental, and sensory awareness in a nurturing, contained environment


Article
How hospice can be a partner in your activity program
Ryan H. Keenan, ACC, NCCAP
Summer 2008; pages 34-36

Abstract
Activity Directors and Hospice Volunteer Coordinators can be great partners if good ethical business practices are utilized by both parties. Activity Directors and hospices can work together to build their volunteer programs. Both the hospice and the long term care facilities depend on volunteers to supplement their programs. Some volunteers are better served in some capacities or settings than others. Knowing our volunteers and understanding their needs not only helps us p rovide better patient care but also helps the retention and growth of our volunteers.


Article
A day in the life of a nursing home resident
Brianne Martindale
Summer 2008; pages 37-42

Abstract
This article addresses the importance of the following: • engaging residents, • allowing residents   to express   themselves, • giving residents   opportunities to   control their   environment, • respecting residents   as individuals, and • enabling the   residents to be as   independent as   possible.


Article
A plea from all the “mes” I will be
Richard Taylor, PhD
Summer 2008; pages 43-48

Abstract
Richard Taylor, PhD, has been living with the diagnosis of Dementia, probably of the Alzheimer's type for the past six years. He recently published a book of his essays (Alzheimer's from the Inside Out, available from HealthProPress.com 1-888-337-8808). He looks forward to your response to his thoughts at richardtaylorphd @gmail.com.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Fall 2008, Volume 9
, Number 4


Article
Editorial The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services roll out MDS 3.0 in October 2009
Linda L. Buettner, PhD, LRT, CTRS
Fall 2008; pages 5-7

Abstract
To introduce the new MDS 3.0 regulations that will be implemented in October of 2009


Article
ADQ inservice Notes from nursing: Residents with Parkinson’s dementia
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Fall 2008; pages 8-10

Abstract
This article provides tips for dealing with residents in long term care facilities who have Parkinson’s dementia


Article
Creative intergenerational programming
Lauren Regas, MT-BC
Fall 2008; pages 11-15

Abstract
Creative intergenerational programming can be rewarding for adults of all cognitive abilities and children of all ages. Developed at the University Hospitals Extended Care Campus in 2003, the intergenerational program has become a vital part of the campus’ assisted living therapeutic programming. Two creative and diverse programs offered are Partners in Time, a music-based intergenerational group combining preschool and elderly residents, and Intergenerations, a creative storytelling intergenerational group combining middle school students and elderly residents. Both groups’ objectives focus on increasing social interaction between the elderly and young, familiarizing students with the elderly and aging process, and providing leadership and nurturing roles for the elderly in assisted living facilities. Creative medium such as pictures, stories, and music allow all participants the opportunity to participate as a group, facilitate, or simply listen, watch, and enjoy each others’ company.


Article
Programming ideas for the memory impaired resident
Cathy Allen, CTRS, ACC
Fall 2008; pages 17-21

Abstract
Readers will be able to describe four positive changes that may take place in response to activities for residents with dementia.


Article
ADQ Proven Activities
Fall 2008; pages 23-23

Abstract
Winter Sports League


Article
ADQ Seasonal Planner
Fall 2008; pages 24-25

Abstract
January, February, March


Article
ADQ Featured Lesson Plan
Fall 2008; pages 26-26

Abstract
Jazzy jewelry club


Article
Socially based activities to help residents with dementia stay connected
Linda L. Buettner, PhD, CTRS, LRT; Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Fall 2008; pages 27-31

Abstract
This article will include information about the benefits of activity therapy sessions designed to increase positive relationships with others, offer opportunities to express emotions, to increase decision making, decrease symptoms of depression, increase motivation, and increase social interactions. It includes evidence from recent research and helpful tips and resources.


Article
Outcomes of a two-year study on using the Dementia Practice Guidelines for Recreational Therapy
Ron Becker, MS, CTRS
Fall 2008; pages 32-40

Abstract
A New York State Department of Health Grant Program, focused on addressing the quality of life for people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, solicited grant proposals to address quality of life issues for this vulnerable population. Coler-Goldwater was awarded a grant to study the efficacy of using the Dementia Practice Guidelines (DPG) in addressing inappropriate behaviors in adults with dementia. Working with Gouverneur Nursing Facility, a 210 bed nursing facility in Manhattan, a core team of senior staff provided oversight support to educate all disciplines working on the selected units to put the guideline into practice.


Article
Therapeutic program idea—Life 101: Coping with the challenges of aging
Suzanne Fitzsimmons, MS, GNP, ARNP
Fall 2008; pages 41-48

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe a program that staff can use with older adults, struggling with the challenges of aging.