Activities Directors QuarterlyAbstracts
Activities Directors Quarterly ®

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American Journal of Disaster Medicine

Journal of Opioid Management

Opioid Management Society
Opioid Education Programs

Journal of Neurodegeneration & Regeneration

Activities Directors' Quarterly for Alzheimer's & Other Dementia Patients

American Journal of Recreation Therapy

Journal of Emergency Management

Healing Ministry

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Activities Directors Quarterly
Winter 2003, Volume 4
, Number 1


Article
ADQ forum Laughter unlocks the memories of the heart: The radical role of humor in Alzheimer’s care
James R. Dowling, MS
Winter 2003; pages 4-6

Abstract
Humor is known to be a major aspect of good health. Research has linked laughter to decreased pain, a strengthened immune system, enhanced memory, and stress reduction. As a cognitive exercise, it may turn out to be one of the best of all, promoting a sense of security, belonging, community, and, of course, joy.


Article
Success through Individual Recreation (STIR): Working with the low-functioning resident with dementia
Tonya Russen-Rondinone, MA; Anne-Marie M. DesRoberts, CRD
Winter 2003; pages 7-12

Abstract
The needs of lower-functioning, later-stage residents with dementia who are unable to experience satisfaction or success in group situations are addressed by the Success through Individual Recreation (STIR) program. STIR’s one-to-one activities are individually tailored to meet the psychosocial needs of these residents who find most group activities too frustrating or overwhelming to enjoy or even tolerate. STIR activities, enjoyed in partnership with hugs, conversation, and hand-holding, promote socialization, sensory and cognitive stimulation, and feelings of worthiness, productivity, and self-esteem among residents.


Article
Reconstructing the self through drama and creative arts therapies
Catherine Chin, MA, RDT
Winter 2003; pages 13-22

Abstract
This narrative chronicles the experiences and insights of a drama therapist coleading an in-patient Alzheimer’s group using the modalities of play-acting and creative arts over a 12-month period. The purpose is to challenge current precepts and encourage further study of the benefits of drama therapy for patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Drama therapy, a powerful but often overlooked modality, can be an effective tool in teaching Alzheimer’s patients to view the self as something that can be reinvented or rediscovered rather than irrevocably lost.


Article
Virtual Dementia Tour©: Sensitizing staff to the degenerative symptoms of dementia
P. K. Beville, PhD
Winter 2003; pages 27-39

Abstract
An important goal for long-term care staff is to try to understand each patient as well as possible. This means doing our best to get into the minds of the persons we are helping, although realistically we know we can never be exactly where they are. Staff frustration can lead to interactions that may be less than helpful or may even completely miss the mark. The purpose of the Virtual Dementia Tour© was to heighten the awareness of staff members to the degenerative physical and cognitive skills common in persons with dementia.


Article
ADQ inservice Common causes of dementia
Sally Albrecht, MA
Winter 2003; pages 40-47

Abstract
Dementia is defined as a cognitive problem—the deterioration of intellectual ability before the end of the physical life span. Although Alzheimer’s is the most prevalent type of dementia, the causes are much more broad. Some are temporary and curable, others may be amenable to treatment, and still others, although incurable, may be managed when accurately diagnosed. An overview of the most common causes of dementia and their respective symptoms are outlined herein so that staff might better understand behaviors and target activities appropriately for optimal care.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Spring 2003, Volume 4
, Number 2


Article
Activity design for individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s dementia
Sally Albrecht, MA
Spring 2003; pages 4-10

Abstract
Feeling useful and succeeding at even the simplest task and activity is of vital importance to individuals with dementia. Structured activities and a routine will provide the necessary tools to achieve these goals. Elements of effective activity programs can include: parallel programming, humor and laughter, program-oriented music and entertainment, word games and directed discussions, meal planning and preparation, physical exercise, and memory-enhancing tasks.


Article
What to do based on who: Personality-based activities for persons with dementia
Ann M. Kolanowski, PhD, RN
Spring 2003; pages 11-16

Abstract
For each of us, our personality is our unique way of adapting to our environment and includes our ways of thinking, acting, and feeling. People with dementia often retain these ingrained patterns of thinking, feeling, and acting. Healthcare providers can use the unique personality strengths of persons with dementia in designing and implementing their recreational activities. This paper discusses techniques and tools that can be used to assess personality and style of interest. A case study is provided in which personality data was used to prescribe activities appropriate to a person with Alzheimer’s disease.


Article
Working together: Helping families become part of the caregiving team
Laura C. Wilson, BA, ACC, CTRS
Spring 2003; pages 17-23

Abstract
In community and residential settings, activity professionals and recreation therapists have many opportunities to meet families and assist them in becoming part of the team of care providers for the person with dementia. This article highlights the educational and support needs of family caregivers and offers practical suggestions for meeting these needs through education, support, and activity programming that includes them. Activity professionals play a key role in the interdisciplinary team that can create these programs for families.


Article
Young at heart: Intergenerational activities involving persons with dementia
Donna E. Deutchman; Kelly A. Bruno, MSW; Shannon E. Jarrott, PhD
Spring 2003; pages 27-35

Abstract
The purpose of the present article is to identify the steps necessary to create effective and life-enriching intergenerational programs involving persons with dementia. The model presented here has been developed in a co-located intergenerational daycare. However, this article discusses how activity directors can tailor the intergenerational model to other care environments.


Article
Dining: The most meaningful of all activities
Jitka Zgola, BOTh
Spring 2003; pages 37-46

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to explore the real relationship between meals and activity programming, to appreciate the importance of integrating mealtime experiences into clients’ daily activities in meaningful ways, and to examine practical ways of doing this. The concepts presented here are grounded in the Bon Appetit! Dining Enhancement Program, that attempts to bring meals in long-term care into their proper focus, i.e., as the most significant activities of the day.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Summer 2003, Volume 4
, Number 3


Article
ADQ inservice Enhancing the quality of nursing home visits with Montessori-based activities
Miriam S. Rose, MEd; Cameron J. Camp, PhD; Michael J. Skrajner, MA; Gregg J. Gorzelle, BA
Summer 2003; pages 4-10

Abstract
Family members who visit a relative with dementia in a long-term care facility may find themselves feeling helpless about what to do during their visits. One way to address this problem is to introduce individualized structured activities that the resident and family member can do together. In an ongoing research study, family member/resident dyads are being trained to use Montessori-based activities. Findings suggest that these activities elicit more frequent active participation and less frequent passivity or nonparticipation compared to typical visits, regardless of the resident’s level of functioning or cognitive status.


Article
The Tea Group: An interview with Ann Marie Monahan and Jitka Zgola
Elizabeth Trafton, Staff Editor
Summer 2003; pages 11-17

Abstract
The purpose of the Tea Group is to offer dementia residents who may be uncomfortable with larger and more demanding group activities an opportunity to experience the warmth and comfort of a small, intimate group that fosters self-esteem and sociability. Tea parties are a familiar ritual around the world, and being in this traditional social situation can bring a sense of comfort to those residents who experience anxiety or withdrawal when attending certain other group activities.


Article
Stimulating sensory activities for older adults with dementia
Cindy Holland, MS; Sally Albrecht, MA
Summer 2003; pages 23-34

Abstract
To offset the damage that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) inflicts on the central nervous system, sensory stimulation for older adults with dementia requires an increase in the frequency, intensity, and duration of stimulation using items that are particularly rich in sensuality. To reach the brain, sensory stimulation from the environment must be abundantly intense, rich, and fertile. Individuals with the cognitive deterioration caused by AD need many opportunities to experience olfactory and gustatory, visual, auditory, and tactile stimulation. This article provides specific activities caregivers can use for each of the four types of sensory stimulation.


Article
Grouping it: Interactive moderate physical activity groups for adults with dementia
Diane Carol Holliman, PhD, LCSW, MPH; Cindy C. Tandy, PhD
Summer 2003; pages 35-40

Abstract
This article describes how to create an interactive moderate physical activity group for adults at mid to low-functioning levels of dementia. The group meets in inpatient or outpatient settings, and the goals are to facilitate reality orientation, provide minimal to moderate physical activity, and encourage social interaction among residents. Scheduling regular and frequent moderate activity group sessions can help to minimize problem behaviors and enhance quality of life among adults with dementia. Recommendations for measuring the effectiveness of the intervention are included.

Activities Directors Quarterly
Fall 2003, Volume 4
, Number 4


Article
Gardens and outdoor spaces for senior living
Elizabeth C. Brawley, IIDA
Fall 2003; pages 5-10

Abstract
The elderly population is increasing dramatically, and designing environments for them has become important, not only for their obvious visual appeal. As they age, people become more dependent on their environment to compensate for increasing frailty and sensory loss, and environmental factors take on even greater significance. Designing an outside garden offers an opportunity to create a place that is meaningful and accommodating, rich in association, and responsive to the seasons.


Article
Move it or lose it: Benefits of exercise for residents with dementia
Nidhi Mahendra, PhD, CCC-SLP; Sharon M. Arkin, PsyD
Fall 2003; pages 11-21

Abstract
The objective of this article is to motivate professionals in long-term care settings to advocate for and introduce more physical activity into the lives of the elderly residents that they serve. Life is movement, and the physical and psychological benefits of exercise are many and profound, particularly for persons with dementia, as will be shown. This article outlines the characteristics and elements of a balanced exercise program for frail elderly individuals and offers practical tips for implementation. Recommendations are based on four years of experience by Sharon Arkin in directing a student-supervised, exercise-based rehabilitation program1-3 for early-stage community-dwelling Alzheimer’s patients, and Nidhi Mahendra’s experience in adapting this program for elders in residential facilities.


Article
The buddy program: A mentoring team approach to improve quality of life of dementia residents in nursing homes
Esther Loring Crispi, PhD; Marian Rokeach, MPH
Fall 2003; pages 27-36

Abstract
The objective of this “buddy” partnership program, conducted at a suburban nursing home, was to improve the communication between nursing home staff, family members, and residents with dementia and thereby improve the quality of life of the residents. Families provided detailed biographical information to staff volunteers, who then visited with their resident buddies for three months. Supervisory staff acted as mentors for the staff volunteers to provide guidance and support. Staff, families, and residents expressed satisfaction with the program. One year later, most staff still visited with available resident buddies.


Article
Hands & Hearts for the Arts: Enhancing the ability to guide creative artistic expression in dementia patients
Robin Hamon, MSW
Fall 2003; pages 37-42

Abstract
Those who assist dementia patients with arts activities often need to bolster their own confidence in their ability to guide these activities. The Hands & Hearts for the Arts program recruits local artists to run educational workshops for staff, family members, and volunteers at the Sanders-Brown Center for the Aging in Lexington, Kentucky. The artists share basic principles and techniques for creating simple but satisfying art projects, such as the wood and clay sculptures described in this article. Workshop participants use their new skills to show persons with dementia easy methods of expressing their own creativity, with a focus on the process, not necessarily the outcome. Creative art experiences increase self-esteem and help a person feel competent and useful.


Article
The SERVE Group: An interview with Jitka Zgola and Ann Marie Monahan
Elizabeth Trafton, Staff Editor
Fall 2003; pages 43-47

Abstract
Some late-stage dementia patients find large group activities overwhelming, confusing, and stressful. It is not simply their dementia that prevents them from enjoying these activities, but their perception of a fast paced, over-stimulating environment. Participating in the smaller SERVE group described in this article provides them with an alternative—a slower, less anxiety-provoking setting in which they can thrive and enjoy themselves without fear or feeling the need to withdraw. SERVE is an acronym for Self-Esteem, Relaxation, Vitality, and Exercise, all of which are enhanced by participation in this small group experience.